cleowho:

"Only a killer would know that."

Boom Town - series 01 - 2005

(via von--gelmini)

(Source: beingfacetious, via roseinabox)

disneydamselestelle:

scottylubemeup:

THIS WAS A CHILDRENS MOVIE

A CHILDRENS BIBLE MOVIE

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) Amen

(via spazztastic-muffin)

My biffle annythecat asked me to do the Ice Bucket Challenge for ALS. I’m planning on donating as soon as I can afford it. I’d also like to encourage my followers to please donate if you can. <3

stoppunchingmyllama Bri, I choose you! ;p Do the thing whenever, babes. ohhstark Same goes for you, bb.

And btdubs that ‘I hate you’ was not directed at you, Bri. It was directed at Anny. >;p

Please pardon my ugly pasty everything face and enjoy. <3

(Source: somethingbeyondprecious)

justroyai:

suluboo:

relationship tip #78: ‘babe’ and ‘baby’ are cliche and outdated. try a fun new nickname such as ‘lieutenant’ instead 

image

(Source: queensamwise, via koopardon)

Batman: The Killing Joke

(Source: jokerismsarchive, via piranhascantsmile)

pennyofthewild:

stirringwind:

actuallytroybolton:

banshelydia:

perfectly-modest:

Islamic headscarf 101.

this is really important because I didn’t realize there was a difference and other people should know this 

This is so cool

this is a great post because it shows the diversity in how women dress across the Islamic world, but I want to point out the limitations of this chart is that NOT all women in all these countries wear the head covering depicted. You often see a variety of different head coverings in every country, and it’s inaccurate to think that’s the only style worn. Even amongst Muslim women, how much hair or their face they cover is VARIED within each country and even Islamic sect. While this graphic is a great resource to give you an idea of popular ways for many women in each country cover their hair/face for religious reasons, it’s not as though the variety of Islamic headcoverings is country-specific, as some people might interpret this chart to mean.
For example, the picture of “Afghanistan”- that’s a burqa. While it’s true a lot of Afghan women wear burqas, not all do. 
These are ALL photos of Aghan women voting:



(x)(x)(x)
 Or in Iran- the graphic shows a hijab. While indeed it’s quite fashionable for many women to wear the headscarf in a manner that shows some of their hair peeking out in the front like this, others ensure they don’t let a single strand show. as this photo shows: 

Others wear a chador too, which is a the long black robe you see a number of women in this photo wearing while queuing to vote- I like this picture because it shows the diversity of how Iranian women dress. 

(x)(x)
This is just so that when you see a woman wearing a headscarf that shows her face and some hair, it doesn’t mean she couldn’t be from Afghanistan. Or if you see a woman wearing a long, black chador that hides her figure, she could very well be from Iran. This goes for the other countries featured here- I’ve seen Syrian and Egyptian women wear a huge variety of head coverings for example. I’ve seen Indonesian Muslim women who don’t wear a headscarf at all. So while some head coverings are more common in each country, it’s not very uniform even within a country, and it usually comes down to each woman’s personal preference.

Bold-italic emphasis mine.

pennyofthewild:

stirringwind:

actuallytroybolton:

banshelydia:

perfectly-modest:

Islamic headscarf 101.

this is really important because I didn’t realize there was a difference and other people should know this 

This is so cool

this is a great post because it shows the diversity in how women dress across the Islamic world, but I want to point out the limitations of this chart is that NOT all women in all these countries wear the head covering depicted. You often see a variety of different head coverings in every country, and it’s inaccurate to think that’s the only style worn. Even amongst Muslim women, how much hair or their face they cover is VARIED within each country and even Islamic sect. While this graphic is a great resource to give you an idea of popular ways for many women in each country cover their hair/face for religious reasons, it’s not as though the variety of Islamic headcoverings is country-specific, as some people might interpret this chart to mean.

For example, the picture of “Afghanistan”- that’s a burqa. While it’s true a lot of Afghan women wear burqas, not all do. 

These are ALL photos of Aghan women voting:

(x)(x)(x)

Or in Iran- the graphic shows a hijab. While indeed it’s quite fashionable for many women to wear the headscarf in a manner that shows some of their hair peeking out in the front like this, others ensure they don’t let a single strand show. as this photo shows: 

Others wear a chador too, which is a the long black robe you see a number of women in this photo wearing while queuing to vote- I like this picture because it shows the diversity of how Iranian women dress. 

(x)(x)

This is just so that when you see a woman wearing a headscarf that shows her face and some hair, it doesn’t mean she couldn’t be from Afghanistan. Or if you see a woman wearing a long, black chador that hides her figure, she could very well be from Iran. This goes for the other countries featured here- I’ve seen Syrian and Egyptian women wear a huge variety of head coverings for example. I’ve seen Indonesian Muslim women who don’t wear a headscarf at all. So while some head coverings are more common in each country, it’s not very uniform even within a country, and it usually comes down to each woman’s personal preference.

Bold-italic emphasis mine.

(via weaverworks)

smilestoinspire:

This is the greatest tweet in the history of tweets

smilestoinspire:

This is the greatest tweet in the history of tweets

(via secarlsberg)

laurajohnsongrey:

roachpatrol:

Stromae - Papaoutai

Last year the most popular video on French TV and the number one song in France and Belgium was “Papaoutai” by Belgian singer Stromae. The tune and rhythms are appealing and unusual; the video is compelling and, ultimately, moving. Though the title sounds like it could be a word in an African language, it is actually meant to be understood by French speakers as meaning “Papa, où t’es?” which translates as “Dad, where are you?” The song and the story of the video refer to the absence of Stromae’s father, who was killed in the Rwandan genocide of 1994. The plaintive cry of the singer who feels the absence of his father is also expressed in the child in the video who begs his mannequin-like father to come to life.

(Source: youtube.com, via oreides)

zingoogniz:

People usually only include the first 2 panels

zingoogniz:

People usually only include the first 2 panels

(via koopardon)

happytheirins:

mangaluva:

slumberblues:

inspired by (x)

When you’ve been abused by a parent like that dealing with anything afterwords is terrifying.

I can only imagine the emotions Zuko was feeling when he apologised to Iroh there. 

^This is one of the reasons that I think going in to apologize to Iroh is one of the bravest things that Zuko’s ever done, because of how much it must have terrified him to do so (Iroh would never hurt Zuko like that, but that fear had to have been at the top of Zuko’s mind at this moment)

And why I love Iroh so, so much for being who he is. 

I will always think of this when I watch that scene now.

(Source: whitejadeflower, via fluffabutt)

dumplingdean:

if you don’t like dean don’t even breathe in my direction.

(via literalstarlight)

prongsmydeer:

Harry Potter AU where someone sees Harry in his cousin’s over-sized clothing with his underfed body and hears him casually mention the cupboard in which he sleeps and calls the fucking police

(via indiemovieboyfriend)